Define accomodating items

Defamation at work occurs when employers, customers or co-workers publish false statements of fact, without legal privilege to do so, that harm the reputation of employees.

A negative employment references can prevent an employee from getting a new job, for example, and would amount to defamation if false, but employers have a "qualified privilege," or a defense to defamation claims for employment references.

Public policy encourages a free flow of information among employers about potential employees, so the law carves an exception out of the law of workplace defamation for reference requests.

If the employer knows that the employee did not steal but says so anyways, the employer probably loses the privilege.

I have had consistent challenges with one, where my female gender and younger age set me apart from the entire sales staff I deal with the...

I am a teacher in Texas and recently received an email from a student's mother that I attempted to have her son removed from my classroom due to him being an African American.

An employer has a qualified privilege to make statements about its employees concerning matters of their employment, especially when made in response to another employer's request for a reference.

An employer may avoid a finding of defamation if it exercised reasonable care when it made the false statement.

For example, an employer that informs an employee assistance program that a truck driver tested positive for heroin use is not liable for defamation if the positive test was false because the employee did not tell the drug testing lab that he was taking prescribed Vicodin.

For example, saying that detectives are questioning an employee about a suspected theft could imply that the employee is a suspected thief, or a witness to a theft.

In that case, the court can conclude that the statement meant the employee was a witness and find that the statement is innocent.

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